Blog

August 14, 2018

Using Music to Improve Sensory Processing

Music is frequently used as a therapeutic tool to calm or organize children. However, does music really have the potential for sensory organization? In 2007, researchers Hall and Case-Smith conducted a study exploring the effects of sound based intervention for those with sensory processing disorder. They found that children who used a sensory diet in… Read more »

July 6, 2017

An OT’s Guide to a Sensational Summer

Summer is a great time to relax and change up our routines. Less structure sometimes leads to boredom. Here are some fun activities to engage in with your child to help liven up summer break while keeping your child regulated. Indoor crafts and messy play Make homemade slime with school glue and Borax detergent. Got… Read more »

May 18, 2017

You Don’t Have to Brush Your Teeth – Only the Ones You Want to Keep!

Brushing teeth and visiting the dentist are two challenging activities for children with sensory issues. The sheer thought of someone going into their mouths can be enough to send children with sensory issues into meltdown mode. With a few practical tips, both you and your child can be better supported in both of these dreaded… Read more »

May 11, 2017

The Vestibular System: A tutorial

We are all familiar with our five basic senses through which we explore our environment. Did you know that we have an additional special sense known as the vestibular system? This complex system is located in the inner ear and consists of gravity receptors that detect linear (such as running straight or swinging back and… Read more »

December 29, 2016

How Can You Help Your Child with Sensory Integration?

Sensory integration is the way we take in and make use of information about the environment around us through our senses. Our brains are constantly receiving and processing little bits of information about what we are touching, how we are positioned in space, how we are moving in relation to gravity, as well as what… Read more »

December 22, 2016

Holiday Fun–Keep Up Skills & Try Some New Ones!

It’s officially the holiday season! Thus begins the hunt for activities to keep our children engaged and learning while having fun during time away from their regular activities. While holiday breaks from school are a time for relaxing, it’s also a time for children to explore activities that they may not be exposed to in school as well… Read more »

December 16, 2016

You Will Not “Zone-out” With This Self Regulation Program

The Zones of Regulation Curriculum was designed to help children become more successful in school, at home, and in the community by independently controlling maladaptive behaviors through the process of self regulation and emotional control. What is self regulation? Self regulation is the ability to be in the best state to successfully engage in a particular activity. When exposed… Read more »

December 9, 2016

Sensory Strategies in Action: How to Alert or Calm Yourself or Your Child

You may have heard of relaxation techniques to calm oneself by using soothing music or deep breathing. What about techniques to alert oneself when experiencing low energy? When addressing sensory strategies we often think of the sense of smell, sight, hearing, touch, and taste.  From a sensory integration perspective, we also have the vestibular (balance)… Read more »

December 2, 2016

Red Flags for Sensory Processing Disorder

Sensory processing refers to how individuals process the information provided by all the sensations coming internally from the body from the environment. These senses work together to give us a sense of the world and our place in it. The brain organizes the information about the different smell, sounds, textures, sights, tastes, and movements that… Read more »

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